Wrapping up the Bumper Project – At long last: here’s the details on Ulysses’ rear swing-out. This swing-out carries a full-size 285/65R18 (33×11.50) spare, Hi-Lift Jack, small Eezi-Awn K9 Table, 42-liter Alubox to store water/propane hoses and the water heater, and a 10# propane tank to fuel the stove, water heater, and fire pit. License plate lighting is provided from a set of LED bolt lights. The framework is made almost entirely from upcycled steel salvaged from a friend’s old teardrop frame, and it all rides on an A-to-Z Fab Mega-Duty Hinge. Building the swing-out atop the already squared and straight bumper was a much simpler feat than building the bumper, so on to the fabrication photos…… Swing-out
Sometimes you just have to D-I-Y – After two years of waiting for either delivery of the rear bumper I purchased, or a full refund of the rather large deposit, I’d had enough: it was time to look elsewhere. Discovery II rear bumpers are a tricky thing—a combination of unusual curves and angles, lack of frame tie-in points on the long overhang, and the general lack of symmetry on these trucks creates many challenges in the design process. As a result, most bumpers on the market are either prohibitively expensive or extremely ugly. RTE Fabrication’s rear bumper is arguably the best looking of the bunch and has a beautifully near-factory appearance, but I couldn’t get over the jungle gym they use for their swing-out. It was clear there was only one way to get what I wanted: a custom build. Once again I enlisted help from the exceptionally talented Dave Argust to design and fabricate all the little (and big) parts necessary to pull this project off. Prototyping on something like a Jeep can be fairly easy—straight lines and a body tub that ends cleanly before the bumper mean you can bolt on practically anything from the frame back. While the mounts are similar on a Discovery, the body is blended into the (frame mounted) bumper through several pieces of molded plastic, all designed to flex and bend just enough to allow for body movement. This meant building much of the bumper in place on the vehicle, and installing and removing the bumper dozens of times to check clearances…tedious work. I’m not a huge fan of the ubiquitous 2 x 6″ oval lights found on so many aftermarket bumpers, but I do understand now why they are used so often: few DOT-legal brake lights exist that are small enough to fit on a slim 4-inch bumper. I wanted brake lights, not for legality, but because I needed the “high” lamp to restore the rear fog functionality Land Rover gave us. Fortunately, just as the bumper was nearing completion Grote released a brand new tail/brake lamp with integrated reverse lights dubbed the “2-in-1.” Installation hardware attaches via the original bumper mounts on the frame. Access to the bolts hides underneath the new lights, which sit almost exactly where the original reverse and rear fog lamps once did. As an added bonus the trailer wiring is now safely up and away from trail obstacles, with 4- and 7-pin connections built in. Building… Rear Bumper
Upcycled pallet sofa, chairs, and tables – I blame the internet. This project originally started as a simple coffee table idea (which wound up being the very last item built), but it wasn’t long before browsing how-to articles led to a pallet wall article and the inspiration to go big. At long last, what started as a huge pile of dirty pallets in my driveway and a few scribbled measurements in a notebook has been transformed into our new living room media lounge. Now to load it up with pillows…… The Media Lounge
an Internet Explorer fix – Well, that title could be shorter and more to the point, but I have searched months to find a solution to this problem with no luck, using what seemed the most obvious of search terms. So I’m putting this here under this title with these keywords in hope of increasing the odds future searches by other developers will turn up the answer. Anyways, the problem is (again) with Internet Explorer’s handling of the most basic elements, and is still a problem on IE7. Let’s say you have a div (or a span) all nice and pretty, margins just how you want them, content is showing perfectly and all is well. Then you realize you’ll need a table in that div. You want your page to stretch, of course, and in doing so you need the table sized by percentage. This will work just fine the traditional way (or via CSS) in Firefox and Opera, but in IE it will break your div by sizing based on percentage of the window rather than the containing div. Here’s the fix: zoom: 1; Just drop that bit of CSS onto that containing div, either using the style tag or by using your style sheet. This will make IE behave with no ill effects in Firefox or Opera. Of course, the page won’t validate after that, but realistically who cares? Making your site actually work cross-browser is more important than perfect validation, right?… Variable-width Tables