Converting a Disco into a Camper – I’m not fond of ground tents, roof tents, or any other piece of canvas-walled silliness—such shelters should be tolerated when the destination or mode-of-transport leave’s no other option, not adopted as the go-to solution. I hate rattles. I can’t stand clutter. I abhor loose, unsecured gear. I don’t have kids and I don’t take prisonerscarry passengers. I do prefer the comfort of hard walls, lockable doors, and a well-equipped galley…so long as they don’t limit my options on a journey. I also happen to have a Discovery II at my disposal, essentially a trail-ready postal truck disguised as a luxury station wagon. The rear of a Discovery II is downright cavernous, especially when gutted. 46 inches from carpeted floor to headlined ceiling, 63 inches from wall to wall, and nearly seven feet of length to work with over the center console (front seats forward). The Discovery II is why I don’t own a teardrop trailer. The Cargo (and on-board systems) The goal was to keep weight low and clutter non-existent, with a full camping load-out below the deck. In practice there is also room for clothes and personal gear, except for hanging jackets/shirts and my camera gear of course. The cubbies from top to bottom, left to right contian: driver’s clothing and personal gear, water tank, passenger’s clothing and personal gear, standard sleeping gear (pads, pillows, blankets), more water tank, complete toolkit (everything I need for every task on a Discovery), optional trip-specific gear (cold-weather sleeping gear, Little Red Campfire, shower mat, etc), slide-out galley (and food), and freezer/fridge (beverages and food). On-board water flows from an 11-gallon tank riding low and center under the deck. In the rear passenger footwell hangs a SHURflo 3.0GPM water pump, water distribution lines, and a back-up gravity fed tap (just in case). Taps are located at the rear passenger door and above the galley. The rest of this space holds recovery tools so they can be accessed without opening doors (just move the seats), and to keep weight low. It’s also a good place to stuff flip-flops and muddy boots while sleeping. Sleeper and galley systems are powered by a secondary Group 31 battery behind the rear left wheel, which recharges via solar or while the engine is running. This placement is opposite the spare tire and main battery to help maintain weight balance. 12-volt extension cords, fold-up solar panel, and other accessories are also stored in this… Sleeper
Sometimes you just have to D-I-Y – After two years of waiting for either delivery of the rear bumper I purchased, or a full refund of the rather large deposit, I’d had enough: it was time to look elsewhere. Discovery II rear bumpers are a tricky thing—a combination of unusual curves and angles, lack of frame tie-in points on the long overhang, and the general lack of symmetry on these trucks creates many challenges in the design process. As a result, most bumpers on the market are either prohibitively expensive or extremely ugly. RTE Fabrication’s rear bumper is arguably the best looking of the bunch and has a beautifully near-factory appearance, but I couldn’t get over the jungle gym they use for their swing-out. It was clear there was only one way to get what I wanted: a custom build. Once again I enlisted help from the exceptionally talented Dave Argust to design and fabricate all the little (and big) parts necessary to pull this project off. Prototyping on something like a Jeep can be fairly easy—straight lines and a body tub that ends cleanly before the bumper mean you can bolt on practically anything from the frame back. While the mounts are similar on a Discovery, the body is blended into the (frame mounted) bumper through several pieces of molded plastic, all designed to flex and bend just enough to allow for body movement. This meant building much of the bumper in place on the vehicle, and installing and removing the bumper dozens of times to check clearances…tedious work. I’m not a huge fan of the ubiquitous 2 x 6″ oval lights found on so many aftermarket bumpers, but I do understand now why they are used so often: few DOT-legal brake lights exist that are small enough to fit on a slim 4-inch bumper. I wanted brake lights, not for legality, but because I needed the “high” lamp to restore the rear fog functionality Land Rover gave us. Fortunately, just as the bumper was nearing completion Grote released a brand new tail/brake lamp with integrated reverse lights dubbed the “2-in-1.” Installation hardware attaches via the original bumper mounts on the frame. Access to the bolts hides underneath the new lights, which sit almost exactly where the original reverse and rear fog lamps once did. As an added bonus the trailer wiring is now safely up and away from trail obstacles, with 4- and 7-pin connections built in. Building… Rear Bumper