An on-going, ever-changing list of equipment and modifications – Basic Equipment: Naturally aspirated 2.5L Boxer 4-cylinder, 35mm spring lift, 215/70R16 all-terrain tires Project Goals: quick and efficient backcountry travel over mild-to-moderate terrain, light-duty load carrying to remote hiking/biking trails, economical all-weather commuter Modifications and Upgrades: +35mm Ironman Spring Lift, KYB GR2 struts, Primitive Racing full armor package, prototype rock sliders, snorkel (raised air intake), OEM Oil Cooler, Maxtrax, Yakima Load Bars, Yaesu GX8-R 2m/70cm radio, Living Overland on-board water, front and rear bumpers in development… Foz Specs
Sir Clax-a-Lot, Breathing Underwater – At first blush the entire concept sounded absurd. Then I remembered a few unexpected water crossings we’d taken the low-riding Forester through on previous trips. The car made it across just fine, but I’ll admit a few more inches of depth might have spelled trouble. Do I think a (non-rallied) Foz really needs a snorkel? No…but considering how inexpensive they are, the unexpected performance gains, and the looks a Forester with a snorkel gets on the trail, it was worth it. Absurd, but worth it. This guide is written based on a non-turbo 2003 model. If you’re doing this on the turbo version or a different model year you might find a different story under the hood and need to adjust your install accordingly. As always, this article is for educational purposes only and I assume no liability if you screw up your car, set your garage on fire, or drown your Scoobaru doing something stupid. Here’s What You’ll Need A snorkel for a 1990-1997 Mitsubishi Pajero Diesel. These can be found on eBay for under $140 USD shipped. I ordered mine from this guy down in Australia, and it arrived within the week. The correctly sized allen key, wrenches, and a rivet gun for the snorkel’s hardware…figure these out after you receive the snorkel so you know you have the right sizes. An 8mm, 10mm, and 12mm wrench and/or socket-and-ratchet. A flat-head screwdriver for the hose clamps. A 3-inch hole saw. A drill, with various sized bits for the snorkel’s hardware. Sandpaper and/or a dremel tool come in handy for smoothing out the rough edges. Assorted 3-inch intake ducting and elbows, or flexible intake tube (recommended). Silicone, rated for use near oils, fuel, and high temperatures since it’ll be under the hood. Lock-tite (red). Push-on weather strip, rubber trim, or an old 1/4-inch hose to pad any rough edges. Prepping the Car You’ll need to remove the air box and a portion of intake tubing (see photos above), as well as the fender liner so you can access the backside of the fender. Alternately, if you’re really worried about rain getting into the motor, you can keep the air box, cut a hole in the side of it for the snorkel, and figure out how to close up the original intake at the front. I chose to remove it, as other owners have reported no issues with rain getting sucked in, and… Snorkeled
An on-going, ever-changing list of equipment and modifications – Basic Equipment: 4.6L Land Rover V8, factory drivetrain, 3-inch lift, LT285/65R18 tyres (33-inch tires) Project Goals: mid-range exploration and overland travel, moderate load carrying capability over challenging terrain, in-camp comfort and convenience Modifications and Upgrades: OME Constant HD 2-inch Lift, Columbia Overland 1-inch Spacers, ARB Bullbar with 12k TJM Winch, custom rear bumper and swing-out, HLCfab Sliders, fuel tank skid, front and rear QT diff skids, dual Odyssey 2150s, Lightforce LED 180 forward lighting, LED rock/camp lights, custom roof storage and rear awning (in development), 2-meter/70cm radio, Viair on-board air, inline thermostat, 35-qt. fridge/freezer, 11-gallon on-board water system, Triton water heater (camp shower), WindowSOX, upgraded rear door panel, on-board galley (in development), nano-camper conversion with permanent camping loadout… Disco Specs
Less Spaghetti, More Cooling – I made the mistake of performing a coolant flush on the Discovery last year, which in it’s life had never experienced problems with the cooling system. It was long overdue, but instead of being a simple matter of replacing old coolant with new it turned into a nightmare of unstable running temperatures, genuine “repair” failures, and frustrations with the original Land Rover design. I decided it was time to toss out the complexity, hard to find parts, and acid-based coolant and build something better… Inline Thermostat
I’ve been in the market for a roof rack for some time now, both as a mounting point for antennas/lights, and to carry bulky (but light) gear like sleeping bags and tarps. Since my needs are very small and I really like the view out of my sunroof, I really wanted a half-length rack. I also wanted it to sit nice and low, close to the roof’s surface. There are only a few off-the-shelf options available for a roof rack on a Discovery, and almost all of them are full racks. In fact, the only half-rack option I was able to find is by a company that has an awful reputation on the various Land Rover forums. Ultimately, I opted to go with a unit from Defender Rack and figure out some other way to handle mounting. Defender makes a model that is 4 feet wide (perfect on a Discovery) and can be had as short as 3 feet—I went with a 5-foot one-piece welded model. The build-quality is top-notch, but it could have used another trip through the powder coater as it is already showing (slight) signs of rust from this year’s rain… Defender 4′ x 5′ (half) Roof Rack
Columbia Rovers Aluminum Fuel Tank Skid offers 1/4-inch of fuel tank protection at only 18 pounds of added bulk. I’ll admit, I’m still a skeptic of aluminum when it comes to protecting a two-ton truck from rock damage, but recent conversations with other off-roading experts have convinced me to give it a try. I’ve opted to do this test with a fuel tank skid, since there is not one available from the factory, and it is not a place I would consider in the least bit vulerable (in 5 years of wheeling a Discovery, I have never hit the fuel tank)… Aluminum Fuel Tank Skid