Wrapping up the Bumper Project – At long last: here’s the details on Ulysses’ rear swing-out. This swing-out carries a full-size 285/65R18 (33×11.50) spare, Hi-Lift Jack, small Eezi-Awn K9 Table, 42-liter Alubox to store water/propane hoses and the water heater, and a 10# propane tank to fuel the stove, water heater, and fire pit. License plate lighting is provided from a set of LED bolt lights. The framework is made almost entirely from upcycled steel salvaged from a friend’s old teardrop frame, and it all rides on an A-to-Z Fab Mega-Duty Hinge. Building the swing-out atop the already squared and straight bumper was a much simpler feat than building the bumper, so on to the fabrication photos…… Swing-out
Sometimes you just have to D-I-Y – After two years of waiting for either delivery of the rear bumper I purchased, or a full refund of the rather large deposit, I’d had enough: it was time to look elsewhere. Discovery II rear bumpers are a tricky thing—a combination of unusual curves and angles, lack of frame tie-in points on the long overhang, and the general lack of symmetry on these trucks creates many challenges in the design process. As a result, most bumpers on the market are either prohibitively expensive or extremely ugly. RTE Fabrication’s rear bumper is arguably the best looking of the bunch and has a beautifully near-factory appearance, but I couldn’t get over the jungle gym they use for their swing-out. It was clear there was only one way to get what I wanted: a custom build. Once again I enlisted help from the exceptionally talented Dave Argust to design and fabricate all the little (and big) parts necessary to pull this project off. Prototyping on something like a Jeep can be fairly easy—straight lines and a body tub that ends cleanly before the bumper mean you can bolt on practically anything from the frame back. While the mounts are similar on a Discovery, the body is blended into the (frame mounted) bumper through several pieces of molded plastic, all designed to flex and bend just enough to allow for body movement. This meant building much of the bumper in place on the vehicle, and installing and removing the bumper dozens of times to check clearances…tedious work. I’m not a huge fan of the ubiquitous 2 x 6″ oval lights found on so many aftermarket bumpers, but I do understand now why they are used so often: few DOT-legal brake lights exist that are small enough to fit on a slim 4-inch bumper. I wanted brake lights, not for legality, but because I needed the “high” lamp to restore the rear fog functionality Land Rover gave us. Fortunately, just as the bumper was nearing completion Grote released a brand new tail/brake lamp with integrated reverse lights dubbed the “2-in-1.” Installation hardware attaches via the original bumper mounts on the frame. Access to the bolts hides underneath the new lights, which sit almost exactly where the original reverse and rear fog lamps once did. As an added bonus the trailer wiring is now safely up and away from trail obstacles, with 4- and 7-pin connections built in. Building… Rear Bumper
It all started with a CRACK! In a matter of seconds, an old man with bad eyesight and a late-90s Dodge Dakota had reduced the front end of my Discovery to shattered plastic. I’m still amazed that my fellow motorists find it hard to see a seven foot tall truck in broad daylight—no, this isn’t the first time someone has run into my truck in a parking lot. Despite proper parking lot speeds too slow to register on the speedometer, the insurance adjuster informed me there was $1,600 worth of crumpled cosmetic complexity in need of repair. I smiled and thanked him for stopping by as he handed over the freshly printed funding for the next upgrade. Stout aftermarket bumpers have always been in the build plan for this truck, but rarely do I come across an example of a good looking bumper on a Discovery. It’s a strange market, where “industry leaders” frequently disappear under mysterious or dubious circumstances, and new companies pop up out of nowhere. The rest of my week was spent researching prices, weights, strength, options, accessories, compatibilities, mounting points, crash performances, horror stories, and most importantly—sexiness when paired with the beautiful front end of a 2004 Discovery. Throughout all this craziness only two companies have stood the test of time and continually delivered proven solutions. Only one of these met my strict aesthetic requirements, so I set aside the biases left over from my Big Jeep days and put in the request for an ARB Bullbar. A few weeks later a box nearly the size of the Discovery arrived. The Install Installing the bumper is a relatively straight-forward task, and ARB does an excellent job writing out detailed instructions (something surprisingly few manufacturers have mastered). However, there are still a few pointers that were left out, so I will focus on those here. First up… Install your winch before you install the Bullbar! As might seem obvious, getting the winch into the Bullbar is much easier with the Bullbar sitting face-down on the ground. What isn’t obvious is the bottom-heavy attitude the bumper will have when maneuvering it onto the truck and finalizing the fitting with a winch hanging off the back, which makes it all much easier to accomplish. All of this can be done before tearing down your truck, that way you still have wheels if you need to make a trip to the hardware store (I did, twice).… ARB Bullbar